#AskPaulKirtley Episode 11: Multi-tools vs Bushcraft Knives, Bug Nets, Kit Storage & Worldwide Bushcraft Freedom

by Paul Kirtley

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In this episode of #AskPaulKirtley I answer questions about multi-tools vs knives, bug nets, am I ever going to run courses “up north”, how and where to store outdoor equipment when you are not using it and where in the world can we go to practice all aspects of bushcraft.

What Is #AskPaulKirtley?

#AskPaulKirtley is my Q&A video and podcast series that aims to answer your questions about bushcraft, survival skills and outdoor life.

The idea here is partly to take the strain off my email inbox and get answers out to people in a more timely fashion.

Rather than send an answer to just that one person, I’d like others to benefit from the answers too. So, just in the same way I’d previously write an email answer, here I’m going to speak the answer (which is much quicker than me typing out an answer, so I’ll get more questions answered as well as benefiting more people).

Click here to find out the different ways you can ask me a question.

Watch #AskPaulKirtley

#AskPaulKirtley videos are also available to view on my YouTube channel.

Listen To #AskPaulKirtley

Use the following Soundcloud controls to listen to the audio podcast right here or download the .mp3 to your device…

Links For This Episode of #AskPaulKirtley

How To Find A Place To Practice Bushcraft Skills In The UK

#AskPaulKirtley On Other Platforms

The videos will be uploaded my YouTube channel and embedded in the Facebook Page associated with this blog as well as embedded here on my blog.

The audio-only podcast version is available on here on Soundcloud and will be added to iTunes and other popular podcast directories in due course, as well as available here on this blog.

Leave A Comment…

Leave me a comment below. Let me know what you think. I read every one.

But remember if you want to ask a question for a future episode, don’t do this in the comments below, do it in one of the ways explained HERE.

 

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Paul Kirtley is an award-winning professional bushcraft instructor. He is passionate about nature and wilderness travel. In addition to writing this blog Paul owns and runs Frontier Bushcraft, a wilderness bushcraft school, offering bushcraft courses and wilderness expeditions.

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{ 19 comments… read them below or add one }

Aisa

Very nice episode Paul. I like all of them. I´m sorry but I have to comment the last quiestion and I hope not to be rude but honest. First of all, if someone asks that question, I guess he is not really prepared for what it really is. I think if you want to “go wild”, you better don´t ask. Rules are made to make everything better and respect the nature. So if someone asks where to go I would guess that he doesn´t know what it really is to go and survive on your own. Anyway, to ask for “no rules” place it sounds to me like you don´t understand that, with or without the law, the first rules are respect and common sense. And if what you want is not to pay a license, or a fee, better don´t go anywhere. I mean, he is not the only one who would like to go to such place. Hope no one gets offended. I would like to hear other opinions. May be I missunderstood or I´m wrong. Great job Paul, I´m a real follower.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Aisa, I don’t think you are being rude in making these points. They are good points and you make them very well. Thanks for adding to my answer.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

David Fiorini

Hey Paul,
Thanks for the yet another great video!

Oh yes, I’m sure we all heard those annoying planes! They certainly ruin the serenity of the beautiful place you are doing this podcast from.

Anyhow, thank you again for the great info.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

You’re very welcome David 🙂

Reply

Rob Hayden

Hello Paul,
This is a quick comment on the question asked about where one might practice all elements of camping, hunting, fishing, fire and shelter building etc.
I am a member of a sportsman’s club here in the states. Although most members use the facilities at the club for the shooting sports (skeet, trap, 5-stand, pistol, rifle and archery ranges) the club owns almost 400 acres where members can camp. Fishing and hunting is allowed within the bounds of state laws and licenses.
Since this club is in the smallest of the fifty states, I can’t help but think there are clubs like this, perhaps with much bigger acreage in many places at least in the U.S.
All the best. Keep up the good work.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Rob, that sounds like a very beneficial arrangement. Thanks for the heads up. It’ll be interesting to hear from others if there are similar set ups further afield.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Clayton Baldwin

Hi Paul , thought I would make a comment on your blog and thank you here for the videos and articles you give us . Concerning the last question it brought back memories to me when I came back to England after spending 20 years in New Zealand where I got my love of the outdoors first solo camping at 13 years of age , everything there was so open to whoever wanted to use it .I could fish for trout,catch eels and crawlies (fresh water crayfish),I hunted rabbit and wood pigeon and deer and always cooked over a open fire I knew what woods to use and even what plants were edible even built debris shelters but still dont like them,lol ,all taught to me by a elderly friend of my parents . On returning to England at the age of 25 I couldnt believe how restricted people were in their ability to experience the outdoors the way I had .I can understand to an extent why the question was asked especially if they live in a highly populated area where all outdoor areas are controlled.Thanks Clayton

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Clayton, thanks for taking the time to share some of your background. It sounds like you had and idyllic upbringing – certainly by my standards and those of other readers of this blog – and that you learned some great skills and had many valuable experiences during that time. Thanks for sharing. Warm regards, Paul

Reply

Matt

Hi Paul

Yet another great video/podcast. One of the best sources on the net as far as I am concerned. Keep up the great work.

Hoping to get on one of your courses in 2016. Would be easier for me if you could do one a bit further north hint hint 😉

Cheers

Matt.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Matt,

Thanks for your comments. I’m very happy to read you find my blog so useful.

I can’t promise to run courses furher north in 2016 but I do hope you manage to get on one of my courses at some stage.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Hils

Hey Matt
Paul is running a course in the Lake District next year…
Hils

Reply

Andrew Casey

Hi Paul,

Congrats on another informative episode, but whoever you have upset in British air traffic control it seem they have it in for you. The section on equipment storage was particularly useful as its been on my mind lately, having just moved home last week. I did wince slightly though as I’m out for the weekend and my sleeping bag is rolled up tight as you like and has been since I cleaned it when I came back from Scotland. Oops, I don’t think I’ll be doing that one again.

Thanks again. I find all your work invaluable and a real source of learning. I also helps me develop my goals within the subject the more I learn. For instance when I first started taking a keener interest in bushcraft, my goal was to get out more and now that has develops into getting out more & to understand what I’m seeing whilst out and about.

Andrew

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Andrew, good to hear from you as always. The air controllers do seem to know when I’m recording 🙂 I’m happy to hear that you are resching the goals you have set yourself as well as keeping motivated to learn more. Glad to be of help along the way. Cheers, Paul

Reply

William Frew

Hi Paul, I have just watched and listened to a couple of your video casts, Wash day on Spey, also the kit care and bushcraft freedom issue, both very satisfying.
Your interests and work have been similar to mine though not commercially for quite some time.
Its great to see someone making a living from there passion and is an inspiration to any one with similar interests, keep up the good work it keeps me in touch with all I would rather be doing, all in good time.
Cheers,
Regards,
William

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi William, thanks for your kind words. And despite the familiarity of some of these subjects to you, I’m glad you find my material interesting and engaging. Cheers, Paul

Reply

Tyler

Thanks for the reply to my question!
I am planning on getting a nice Leatherman later this year to replace my cheap-o multitool now.
I never considered the wire cutters to be that essential so I’m glad you pointed that out.

Again, much appreciated Paul. It is amazing that you, as a professional bushcraft instructor, take the time to field questions and offer so much information on your blog.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

My pleasure Tyler 🙂

Reply

Bastiaan Kuijt

Right.. 🙂 apologies for the typo in my question, glad it sparked some laughs 😉

The bugnet question was with your lightweight setup (YT video) in mind.
In the meantime I took my family to Sweden and used two DD Travel hammocks (with the integrated bugnets) for my daughters to either hang or lay under a tarp. They really enjoyed it.
The disadvantage is the time it takes to build two or more tailored setups, since the girls are still to young to do this it meant I was building them and not fishing/playing etc with them. So after a couple of nights we simply bunked together in our 2-3 p. tent. Also cosy.

Reply

Pär Leijonhufvud

I live in northern Sweden (actually quite close to the geographical center of Sweden, but that is the “south of the North”). Here hare quite a bit of space where you can travel (hike, canoe, ski, etc), and fishing licences are easy to sort. As Paul said, hunting is more complex to arrange. We — all of Sweden — have a right of common access that allows you to pass over someones land (but not their backyard!), and to sleep one night. Small fires are ok (unless there is a fire-ban announced), as are picking berries and fungi (generally other kinds of foraging for plants are ok as well).

There are some exceptions, e.g. an area close to here is closed to all visitors at the moment: egg thieves have forced the authorities to take this extreme stance.

Reply

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