Browsed by
Category: Snowshoeing

Winter Magic: Return To The Northern Forest

Winter Magic: Return To The Northern Forest

Each winter I like to get away to the snow. I enjoy winter mountain walking in Scotland. Ski touring in Norway is also a favourite. But the northern forest in winter has a special allure which is hard to escape. I’ve experienced this environment many times and I’ve certainly written about my love of it before. Despite many visits, the pull of the boreal forest seems to grow stronger with greater familiarity. I’m not the only one to be drawn…

Read More Read More

How To Split Firewood on Snow: Key Axe Techniques

How To Split Firewood on Snow: Key Axe Techniques

The amount of firewood required in the northern forest in winter demands the use of an axe. Unlike staying in a cabin, however, when staying in a heated tent you are unlikely to have the use of a chopping block. So, you need to have a repertoire of axe techniques that include being able to safely split logs on snow as well as easily produce…

Winter Clothing for the Northern Wilderness part 2

Winter Clothing for the Northern Wilderness part 2

Footwear, Handwear and Headwear Clothing for winter in the northern wilderness must cope with a wide range of temperatures, from around freezing to -50oC (-58oF) or lower. While your body core must be kept warm to prevent hypothermia, your extremities are more likely to suffer cold injuries and your feet, hands and head need special consideration. This is the second of two articles on clothing for the northern wilderness. The first covers thermal layers and shell clothing. This article covers…

Read More Read More

Winter Clothing for the Northern Wilderness part 1

Winter Clothing for the Northern Wilderness part 1

Thermal Layers and Shell Clothing   Clothing for winter in the northern wilderness must cope with a wide range of temperatures, from around freezing to -50oC (-58oF) or lower.  Your clothing may also have to fend off serious wind-chill, when travelling by snow machine or skiing across barren terrain such as the Hardanger Vidda in Norway. Your body core must be kept warm to prevent hypothermia and unless your core is warm enough, your extremities are more likely to suffer cold injuries….

Read More Read More