#AskPaulKirtley Episode 7: Roadkill, Advice to Aspiring Instructors, Compasses With Mirrors, A Herb Brainstorm and Snails!

by Paul Kirtley

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askpaulkirtley episode 7

In epsisode 7 of #AskPaulKirtley I answer a request for advice on picking up roadkill deer, offer some thoughts for new or aspiring bushcraft instructors, explain what a mirror on a compass is for, scratch my head a bit while choosing 5 medicinal herbs and talk about edible snails and why they are not further up the bushcraft menu…

What Is #AskPaulKirtley?

#AskPaulKirtley is my Q&A video and podcast series that aims to answer your questions about bushcraft, survival skills and outdoor life.

The idea here is partly to take the strain off my email inbox and get answers out to people in a more timely fashion.

Rather than send an answer to just that one person, I’d like others to benefit from the answers too. So, just in the same way I’d previously write an email answer, here I’m going to speak the answer (which is much quicker than me typing out an answer, so I’ll get more questions answered as well as benefiting more people).

Click here to find out the different ways you can ask me a question.

Watch #AskPaulKirtley

#AskPaulKirtley videos are also available to view on my YouTube channel.

Listen To #AskPaulKirtley

Use the following Soundcloud controls to listen to the audio podcast right here or download the .mp3 to your device…

Links For This Episode of #AskPaulKirtley

Five Survival Plants Every Forager Should Know

#AskPaulKirtley On Other Platforms

The videos will be uploaded my YouTube channel and the Facebook Page associated with this blog as well as embedded here on my blog.

The audio-only podcast version is available on here on Soundcloud and will be added to iTunes and other popular podcast directories in due course, as well as available here on this blog.

Leave A Comment…

Leave me a comment below. Let me know what you think. I read every one.

But remember if you want to ask a question for a future episode, don’t do this in the comments below, do it in one of the ways explained HERE.

Related Material On Paul Kirtley’s Blog:

PK Podcast 010: Alyssa Crittenden On The Hadza, Honey And The Human Diet

#AskPaulKirtley Episode 6 – Bushcraft Aspirations, The Bloodvein, Weather Forecasting, Bivvy Tents & Where To Camp…

Water Mint, Mentha aquatica

 

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Paul Kirtley is an award-winning professional bushcraft instructor. He is passionate about nature and wilderness travel. In addition to writing this blog Paul owns and runs Frontier Bushcraft, a wilderness bushcraft school, offering bushcraft courses and wilderness expeditions.

 

{ 30 comments… read them below or add one }

Bozidar

Hi Paul!
Thank You to the new responses, of which we learned a lot.
The seventh episode I especially liked.
We hope to continue to learn from you.
All of your answers and videos is simple and easy to remember,
I hope that you will continue doing so.
Kindest regards !
Bozidar
Croatia

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Bozidar,

As always, it’s good to hear from you. I’m happy you enjoyed this video and you learned from it. Thank you for the feedback.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Victor

Great blog. Road kill deer. What a great off the cuff answer. With big game chilling to 7 degrees through out the meat should take place within 12 hours. Evisceration should be done at best practice within 45 minutes. Examination of the red and green offal should be done by someone in the know. Injuries that may look like they have been caused by a collision might have been there before and overlooked. One critical point with road kill is the fact that you have not observed the animal before it has been killed. This can tell you a lot about the animal and its health. The chilling is a big one when in you think the average temperature in Ireland anyway in December is 8 degrees. Small game road kill is a a different thing altogether with a lower chilling temperature. Great Paul . Thanks for another great blog.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Victor, thanks for your comments and adding to the conversation. In particular you make a good point about not having observed the animal while it was alive and all that can be gleaned from this. Indeed, why was the animal involved in a fatal road collision? Was it slow due to injury or illness? These will obviously be harder to glean from a dead deer than a live one but as you say, it’s a critical point.

Thanks again for your comments Victor.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

ilgat

Enjoyed this episode very much – many thanks for the info.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for the feedback.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Greg Zummo

Hi Paul,
Thanks again for a great video. I wish you had some courses in the US.
Right now a trip to the UK is not in the budget, but perhaps one day.
But in the meantime, I will be looking for any of your books.
Greg Zummo

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Greg,

Thanks for the kind words. Understood regarding the distance/cost of travel.

Keep checking back here for regular updates.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Andrew Casey

Hello Paul,

I really enjoyed another episode, I looked up selfheal straight away. I’m sure it’s in the masterclass, I’m up to date but I’m guilty of needing to re watch the modules and revising my notes. I’m on the hunt to find some selfheal now.

I was also interested in the sighting mirror on the compass, my knowledge on navigation isn’t very good, it’s something I really need to dedicate some time to. Any tips or further reading are always welcome.

Thanks a million
Andrew

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Andrew,

Glad you liked episode 7.

So, is navigation next on the list of skills acquisition?

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Andrew Casey

That and first aid Paul, both are pretty vital but which one first? Choices.

Thanks again paul.

Reply

Hamish

Great answer on using the mirror on a compass. I would find a video on this useful

Thanks
Hamish

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Ok Hamish. Noted and added to my list…

Cheers, Paul

Reply

Adrian

Hi Paul
Thanks for those answers Paul, really usful. I always enjoy the Ask Paul posts. Further to the road kill question, will we be seeing a post on preparing wild game and inspecting the carcass for disease. Would be both useful and interesting.
All the best Adrian.
Ps Glad to see you laughing.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

It’s good to be laughing Adrian.

Agreed regarding game prep – a lot of people would like to know this. I suspect it would have to be a series of videos, not just one. It’s a fairly sizeable subject. I’ll keep you posted…

Keep those questions coming! 🙂

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Marc-André

Hey Paul

Shame on me for forgetting to say my name, haha. I guess I thought the form was enough at the time. It shall serve as a “what not to do” for future people using SpeakPipe 🙂

Thanks for taking the time to answer my vague question. I shall be more precise in the future 🙂

I was actually recently looking to purchase some paracord with reflective material in it, so it was great to have your input on it. In my last camping trip I used some bread plastic clip on which I put some reflective tape so people wouldn’t trip on my lines.

Anyway, thanks again! Cheers!

Reply

Paul Kirtley

No problem Marc-André, I knew who it was once I checked the system back at home again.

I’m glad the paracord answer was useful to you. It’s an interesting thing regarding guylines – I always know where mine are and I’m pretty good at spotting other people’s (you just have to spot the tarp first!) but it’s always other people who kick out my guylines. Yet, I still don’t make them more visible. I guess I’m hoping that people will learn eventually… 🙂

Looking forwards to your next question.

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Woodland_Dweller

Another great episode Paul I particularly enjoyed the bushcraft instructor part great information, the medicinal plant section was also good to listen to.

I think the #askpaulkirtley idea is fantastic thank you for taking the time to do them and keep up the good work love the out takes at the end many thanks,
Stephen.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Stephen,

Good to hear from you. I’m glad you are enjoying these sessions and thanks for your comments on this one in particular.

Glad you like the out-takes too 😉

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Ian

Hi Paul.
I like the episode 7 where you mention about instructors and over stretching them self. You are right, some people do just jump in things and not realize what it takes to teach some one and end up shooting them self in the foot.
A old army saying is if you are asked question you can always answer it by simply saying, I can’t answer that question right now, but I will endeavor to get a answer for you as soon as I can.
Its really not that difficult. No one can know it all and there is always some thing new to learn.

Reply

Ian

Hi Paul.
I like the episode 7 where you mention about instructors and over stretching them self. You are right, some people do just jump in things and not realize what it takes to teach some one and end up shooting them self in the foot.
A old army technique is if you are asked difficult question, you can always answer it by simply saying, I can’t answer that question right now, but I will endeavor to get a answer for you as soon as I can. haha
Its really not that difficult. No one can know it all and there is always some thing new to learn.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Ian. Agreed – it’s a useful and honest technique.

There is indeed always more to learn…

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Pär Leijonhufvud

One use for meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) IA to gain relief from itching insect bites. Just grind the leaves into a poultice and apply to the affected area. It gives at least temporary relief…

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Interesting. I’ve not used meadowsweet for this purpose but I’ll give it a try. Thanks Pär.

Reply

Kevin

Hello paul,
excellent, clear and useful answers all ‘off the cuff’ – surely the sign of a great teacher!
More and more, I feel sorry I’m unable to attend one of your courses; unfortunately, I now live and work as a field biologist in the Czech Republic…though that has its own benefits.
I was particularly impressed with the answer on road kill. I would add that, in many countries, particularly here in mainland Europe where hunting is more widespread, carcasses of game species automatically belong to local hunting associations. All kills, however occurring, must be registered to allow population estimates. Anyone found in possession of a game species that has not been handed in/registered can be subject to large fines. Furthermore, anyone found in possession of protected and rare species (such as otters or European mink), dead or alive, without specific permission is also liable to prosecution.
Regarding medicinal herbs, I would add both thyme and sphagnum moss; both are antiseptics and the moss has long been used as a wound dressing.
Fantastic series, thanks a lot,
best regards,
Kevin Roche

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Kevin,

Thanks for your comments on the episode and the series in general. Thanks also for your additional observations.

Agreed re sphagnum – the king of mosses.

What is your area of work/research?

Warm regards,

Paul

Reply

Martin Rudd

Hi Paul really enjoyed this episode, I’ve always known about eating young hawthorn leaves but was unaware about the berries I’d also never heard of fruit leather but think i know what you mean and I’ll be looking into how it’s made soon
Thanks again for all the episodes and videos
Martin Rudd (Scout/Explorer leader)

Reply

Tom

Absolutely love your website Paul! I started my own at http://www.survivalseverything.com
Nowhere near as good as your site but it’s nice to update it when I learn a new skill

Reply

Pierluigi Tucci

Hi Paul, very informative episode.
I’m learning new skills

Warm regards

Pierluigi Tucci

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Prego! 🙂

Reply

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