#AskPaulKirtley Episode 41 – Winter Bushcraft And Outdoor Life Questions

by Paul Kirtley

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In this episode of #AskPaulKirtley I talk about the dangers of carbon monoxide, ventilation in a snow shelter, anoraks for cold weather, how to learn wilderness ski-touring skills, extra snow on quinzhees, candles for snow shelters, sweaty, clammy clothes in the cold, toilets in the cold…

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Links For This Episode of #AskPaulKirtley

Nutritional Breakdown Of The PLCE Side Pocket Menu
How To Pack Enough Food For A Week In A PLCE Side Pocket
Winter Clothing for the Northern Wilderness part 1
Favourite Thermal Layer & Shell Combinations For The Woods
Fjelltur: A Norwegian Adventure
Exodus Cross-country Skiing Holidays
DNT Guided Tours

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Leave me a comment below. Let me know what you think of this episode. I read every one.

But remember if you want to ask a question for a future episode, don’t do this in the comments below, do it in one of the ways explained HERE.

What Is #AskPaulKirtley?

#AskPaulKirtley is my Q&A video and podcast series that aims to answer your questions about bushcraft, survival skills and outdoor life.

The idea here is partly to take the strain off my email inbox and get answers out to people in a more timely fashion.

Rather than send an answer to just that one person, I’d like others to benefit from the answers too. So, just in the same way I’d previously write an email answer, here I’m going to speak the answer (which is much quicker than me typing out an answer, so I’ll get more questions answered as well as benefiting more people).

Click here to find out the different ways you can ask me a question.

Related Material On Paul Kirtley’s Blog:

Winter Bivvying – How To Stay Warm In A World Of Cold

Winter Woodland Wildcamping: 21 Tips & Tricks

Staying Warm Outdoors: Avoid The Four Horsemen of Heat Loss

 

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Paul Kirtley is an award-winning professional bushcraft instructor. He is passionate about nature and wilderness travel. In addition to writing this blog Paul owns and runs Frontier Bushcraft, a wilderness bushcraft school, offering bushcraft courses and wilderness expeditions.

 

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Dave H

Hi Paul thanks for another great episode, I look forward to these as the content is useful and covers various topics which can be put to use and in turn shared with others. The smearing of faeces does work well, growing up on the farm you soon learn that dung spread too thick does not break down as fast. the increased surface area allows more insects and UV light to do their work. also the gasses disperse faster so the odour vanishes faster. However burial is far more hygienic especially if camping with children around.
Keep up the exceptional work, keep safe, All the best Dave.

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Dave H

Hi Paul,
Thanks for another great episode full of useful information and ideas. Ref`smearing of faeces, when unable to dig into frozen or rocky terrain, when spreading dung on the farm one soon learns the benefit of a thinly applied layer. The more spread out the faster the insects and UV light can reduce the dung. also the thinner the layer the faster the gas can disperse and thus the smell vanishes quicker. This being said burial is by far the more hygienic method, especially if there are children in the group.
Keep up the exceptional work , keep safe and have fun.
All the best, Dave.

Reply

Steve Bayley

With regards to outdoor winter toilet routine: I agree with all your points but would perhaps mention that in areas of greater footfall there can be a case for carrying faeces out. A couple of years ago Cairngorm Park was issuing robust containers that human waste could be packed out in during the winter months. I admit that this may seem a bit grisly, but there is clearly a duty of care on us all to behave responsibily. One can obtain bio-degradeable (corn starch) bags designed for dog owners which are just as suitable for our own personal waste. Of course these should be placed within a suitable container, brought out and disposed of appropriately and not left hanging on a branch or fence as some dog owners do!

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