Plant Foods

Red Currant, Ribes Rubrum

by Paul Kirtley

Post image for Red Currant, Ribes Rubrum

  Red currant, (or redcurrant), Ribes rubrum is a member of the Gooseberry family, Grossulariaceae . Its fruits are edible and it is relatively easy to recognise and distinguish from other species.   Geographic Distribution and Habitat Red currant is native to parts of Western Europe but is also widely cultivated, with some wild populations […] Read more >>

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Post image for How to Avoid Mistaking Lily-of-the-Valley for Ramsons

Lily-of-the-Valley is a poisonous plant found in woodlands in the northern hemisphere, the leaves of which resemble Ramsons, the familiar wild food plant also known as wild garlic. Like Ramsons, Lily-of-the-Valley can form extensive… Read more >>

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Post image for Water Mint, Mentha aquatica – A Not So Wild Tea

Water Mint, Mentha aquatica has a wide distribution across Europe (except the far north), Asia and Africa. It is the most common of the wild mints in the British Isles but is less frequent in Scotland. It has a number of food and medicinal uses and is therefore a useful plant to know for foragers and those interested in bushcraft and survival. As its name suggests… Read more >>

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Post image for How to Tell the Difference Between Chickweed and Yellow Pimpernel

Yellow pimpernel, Lysimachia nemorum, is a small hairless plant, with leaves of a similar shape and size to those of Common Chickweed, Stellaria media. Common Chickweed is an edible wild green that… Read more >>

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Post image for An 80s Revival: Surviving with the Dartmoor Knife

The final production version of the Wilkinson Sword Survival Knife was something of a redesign of the original, officially renamed the Dartmoor Knife CSK185. The best way to review a piece of outdoor equipment, whether it is a knife or a canoe or anything else, is to go and use it for its intended purpose. So, it was thus I decided to get a good measure of the usefulness of the Dartmoor Survival Knife by heading out to the woods for a few days with little else to see how well this survival tool served me… Read more >>

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Post image for Hemlock, Conium maculatum

Hemlock, Conium maculatum is a notoriously poisonous plant. It has large, lacy leaves and purple spots and streaks on the stems. It is found, naturalised, in many parts of the world and usually found on poorly drained soils, roadsides, field edges and… Read more >>

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Post image for Hottentot Fig, <em>Carpobrotus edulis</em>

The Hottentot Fig, Carpobrotus edulis is a southern African plant. Introduced to Europe, the plant can be found entirely naturalised in some coastal habitats, particularly sea cliffs and sand-dunes. The plant tends be quite… Read more >>

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Post image for Yellow Archangel, <em>Lamiastrum galeobdolon</em>

Yellow Archangel, Lamiastrum galeobdolon, is a widespread European woodland plant that is fond of heavy soils. It will grow in very shady areas but also likes some sun and can pop up in abundance in areas that have been coppiced. It can also be found on waysides and verges. In the UK the plant is found more in the south and is relatively widespread as far north as Yorkshire, but less so… Read more >>

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Post image for Red Dead-Nettle, <em>Lamium purpureum</em>

Red Dead-nettle, Lamium purpureum, is a common plant of country tracks and hedgerows. It is often found on or near farmland and sometimes described as an arable weed. Similar to other dead-nettles it has toothed, heart-shaped leaves. Red Dead-nettle, however, bears much less… Read more >>

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Post image for White Dead-Nettle, Lamium Album

Even though White Dead-nettle is not an aromatic herb like some of its other family members, it is edible. White Dead-nettle, Lamium album has toothed, heart-shaped leaves that look very similar to the leaves of Stinging Nettle, Urtica dioica, a plant which is familiar to many. White Dead-nettles and Stinging Nettles also share other charcteristics such as having leaves arranged… Read more >>

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